Policies Of PSC

The Paris Soccer Club is dedicated to ensuring that the sport of soccer is continually enhanced and that guidelines and policies are in place to ensure play remains fun and safe for everyone. The Paris Soccer Club is a member of the Twin Rivers Soccer League and adheres to the Twin Rivers Soccer League Policies, Rules and Procedures.


Call Up Protocol

A coach may call up as many players to bring his/her roster to no more than 16 players in total for U12 to U20, and 12 players total for U10. The call up must be identified on the game sheet and in the appropriate area in the game book. The regular player being replaced must be stroked off the game sheet. If the regular player decides to show up after start time and has already been stroked off the game sheet and replaced by a call up, they will not be allowed to play the game. A player may be called up to the Division above his/her own to play. A coach can only use a call up from their own club’s current registration list.

Keeping in mind:

- Although every effort will be made to provide a call up list for coaches, it is the responsibility of the individual coach to arrange for the required call ups.
- Even though a call up may be on the list it is completely up to the player and parent as to when and how often they will play.
- A call up can and should be encouraged to play on more than one team; meaning that just because one team uses a call up, they can still play for a different team and are not locked into that first team.
- A coach has to advise the convenor of the call ups they have, that way if another team needs a call up when they do not, the players can be utilized properly and fairly.
- If two teams are requesting the same call up player, the decision is up to the player's parent and the player. If there is still no decision the team with the least amount of players should utilize the call up.

1. After the first game coaches have to approach 3 players AND parents to inquire if they would be a call up.
2. By the end of the second game they have to provide at least 2 names to the convenor.
3. A coach cannot keep a call up name to themselves and have to share the name for other teams to approach as well.
4. Call ups names and DOB's need to be provided to the ref prior at the start of game, the onus is on the coach to provide them for the game sheet or the game can be a forfeit.
5. Refs have to put the call up names on the game sheet (not just in the game book) and input them in the comments when they add the game results in power up. Then we can ensure that coaches are sharing the names.

Rain Policy

Games are not cancelled when it is raining. Everyone must attend the fields for all games; even in the rain. If after a 15 minute wait the game can be cancelled by the referee; if there is lightening. If there is no lightening, then the game will be played in the rain. Once the second half is started, if the game is cancelled due to lightening, the game will be considered completed and the score at that time will stand. If the second half is not started and the game is cancelled due to lightening then the game will be considered abandoned. If this occurs the coaches are required to notify the League Coordinator of the abandoned game within 48 hours. They will then make arrangements with the League Coordinator to reschedule the game. Failure to contact the League Coordinator within 48 hours could mean the game is forfeited, with no points awarded.

Environment and Climate Change Canada Heat Humidex

Heat and Humidity


Humidity is the amount of water vapour in the air. In forecasting, relative humidity describes the percentage of moisture in the air in comparison to how much there is when the air is saturated. The higher the reading, the greater the likelihood of precipitation, dew and fog. Relative humidity is normally highest at dawn, when the temperature is at its lowest point of the day.

High humidity makes people feel hotter than they would on a drier day. That’s because the perspiration that occurs to cool us down cannot evaporate as readily in moist, saturated air. To better describe how hot it feels in such circumstances, Canadian meteorologists developed the humidex parameter that combines temperature and humidity in order to reflect the perceived temperature.

Heat and Humidity Safety

It is important to stay safe during such extreme temperatures. Avoid working or exercising intensely if it is very hot or humid outside, and head for cooler conditions if your body becomes overheated. If working outdoors is an absolute necessity, drink plenty of liquids and take frequent rest breaks. Be sure to maintain salt levels in your body and avoid high-protein foods. Also ensure that pets are protected from the heat and have plenty of water to drink. Watch for signs of serious medical conditions, such as heat exhaustion and heat stroke

Relative humidity

Relative humidity is the amount of moisture that the air contains compared to how much it could hold at a given temperature. A figure of 100 per cent relative humidity would mean that the air has become saturated. At this point mist, fog, dew and precipitation are likely.

Relative humidity is normally at its maximum when the temperature is at its lowest point of the day, usually at dawn. Even though the absolute humidity may remain the same throughout the day, the changing temperature causes the ratio to fluctuate.

Humidex

The humidex is a Canadian innovation, that was first used in 1965. It describes how hot, humid weather feels to the average person. The humidex combines the temperature and humidity into one number to reflect the perceived temperature. Because it takes into account the two most important factors that affect summer comfort, it can be a better measure of how stifling the air feels than either temperature or humidity alone.

The humidex is widely used in Canada. However, extremely high readings are rare except in the southern regions of Ontario, Manitoba and Quebec. Generally, the humidex decreases as latitude increases. Of all Canadian cities, Windsor, Ontario has had the highest recorded humidex measurement: 52.1 on June 20, 1953. The hot, humid air masses which cause such uncomfortable weather usually originate in the Gulf of Mexico or the Caribbean.

Guide to summer comfort

Range of humidex: Degree of comfort

  • Less than 29: No discomfort
  • 30 to 39: Some discomfort
  • 40 to 45: Great discomfort; avoid exertion
  • Above 45: Dangerous; Heat stroke possible

An extremely high humidex reading can be defined as one that is over 40. In such conditions, all unnecessary activity should be curtailed. If the reading is in the mid to high 30s, then certain types of outdoor exercise should be toned down or modified, depending on the age and health of the individual, physical shape, the type of clothes worn and other weather conditions.

If working outdoors is an absolute necessity, drink plenty of liquids and take frequent rest breaks. In hot, humid conditions, there is a considerable risk of heat stroke and sun stroke.

During the dog days of summer, remember that animals also feels the heat. When the humidex is high, take special care to ensure that your pet is well-protected from the heat and has plenty of water to drink. Also remember to never leave pets in hot vehicles, even with the window down. On extremely hot days, the inside temperature of a car can be several degrees warmer than the air outside and it is therefore never safe to leave pets or children – even for a few minutes.


Humidex table

Reference Legend

Humidex and Degree of Comfort - Legend
HumidexDegree of Comfort
20 - 29No discomfort
30 - 39Some discomfort
40 - 45Great discomfort; avoid exertion
46 and overDangerous; possible heat stroke

Proper Hydration to AVOID AND PREVENT HEAT RELATED INJURIES WHEN PLAYING SOCCER

There are some simple guidelines which have been prepared by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) when it comes to running activities in a hot and/or humid environment. The goal in participating in hot weather is to avoid fluid loss from the body or dehydration. Water not only accounts for some 98% of our body composition, but functions to help deliver oxygen to working muscles, and keeps the body from overheating during strenuous activity. Hard working muscles generate heat which is dissipated through the act of sweating. Evaporation of sweat on the skin allows the body to get rid of this heat and cool it off. In looking at the objectives for advising officials and participates about this subject it seems that the following categories are areas requiring attention:

1. To educate athletes and event officials about the most common forms of environmental illness including predisposing conditions, warning signs, susceptibility and incidence reduction.

2. To advise officials of their legal responsibilities and potential liability with regard to event safety and injury prevention

3. To recommend that officials consult local weather archives and plan games at times likely to be of low environmental stress to minimize detrimental effects on athletes.

4. To encourage officials to warn athletes about environmental stress on game \ practice day and the implications for heat and cold illness.

5. To inform officials of preventive actions that may reduce debilitation and environmental illness.

6. To describe the personnel, equipment, and supplies necessary to reduce and treat cases of collapse and environmental illness.

To this end, after review of the available literature and after consultation of various medical authorities and officials it was felt that the following recommendations are some key guidelines for soccer participation in the heat:

1. Avoid dehydration and make sure you pre-hydrate: Don’t wait till you feel thirsty because the body will not be able to tell you in time that you are dehydrated, here are some practical recommendations:

- 2 hours before exercise, drink at least 16 oz or 500 ml (an average bottle of water)

- 1 hour before exercise, drink at least 08 oz or 250 ml (half an average bottle of water

- During the exercise, drink at least 4 to 8 oz every 15 - 20 minutes

- Immediately after the exercise, drink at least 16 oz or 500 ml of water or an electrolyte replacing drink

- 1 hour after a training session or game consider drinking 16 oz or 500 ml of skim milk or chocolate milk for protein and muscle repair

2. As a rule of thumb you should drink at least 500 ml for every 20 lbs of body weight, therefore, someone weighing 140 lbs needs to drink at least 3500 ml of fluid per day if training or playing that day.

3. Drinking carbohydrate and electrolyte fluids may be beneficial in avoiding heat trauma.

4. Wearing light breathable clothing is advised.

5. Officials should be very cautious in authorizing games and practices in environments where the temperature plus humidity combined are 35 C and over. They should inquire of the participants to ensure pre-event hydration, medication use and susceptibility to heat injury ( prior occurrence). Also unlimited substitution is recommended during games as is frequent fluid brakes and fluid availability on both sides of the field.

6. Warning flags could be posted on the field as follows:

- green - proceed with caution heat stress possible

- amber - moderate risk to heat stress

- red - high risk to potential heat stress

If used they should be posted at locations easily seen by participants, support staff, medical staff and spectators.

The other issue to consider is, and you may be asking yourself at this point, what are the risk factors which could predispose a soccer player to heat injury. Listed below are a the major risk factors but this is by no means an exhaustive list:

1. Not being acclimatized

2. Unfit

3. Hypo hydration

4. Hyper hydration

5. Use of a variety of medications or supplements

6. Persons with persistent, disabling mental illness

7. Certain medical conditions (cardiac, lung)

How can you tell if one of your soccer players is experiencing heat injury? Below is a list of the early warning signs to look for and again this is not an exhaustive list:

1. Flushed face

2. Hyperventilation or shortness of breath

3. Headache

4. Dizziness

5. Tingling arms

6. Goose bumps (hair on arms standing on end)

7. Chilliness

8. Poor coordination

9. Confusion, agitation, uncooperativeness

A preseason or pre-event conditioning program, when combined with an 8 - 14 day period of acclimatization, may further reduce the risk of heat injury.

There are 3 main types of heat injury identified in the medical literature:

1. Heat Cramps - these are the mildest form of heat trauma and are commonly related to low body sodium and chloride levels.

Signs & Symptoms include - weakness, muscle cramps, collapse with low blood pressure.

Treatment - is aimed at replacing the salt loss and can be oral or by intravenous if vomiting is a problem. Having athletes put a little extra salt on their food the day before and day of game can be a helpful way to avoid this condition.

2. Heat Exhaustion - this is a more severe medical event as follows.

Signs & Symptoms include - weakness, irritability, collapse, unable to sweat adequately to promote body cooling, my proceed in the more ominous heat stroke and a fine rash is often present.

Treatment - remove athlete to a cooler environment, use ice baths, fans.

3. Heat Stroke - THIS IS A MEDICAL EMERGENCY - it is due to a failure of the heat-controlling mechanism. It may occur merely as a result of exposure to heat.

Signs & Symptoms include - mental confusion, headache, poor coordination, delirium, convulsions and death. The body temperature may be 106 F or 40.5 C or higher, the skin is usually hot and dry as the sweating mechanism has failed.

Treatment - Call 911 and transport to a local Hospital. Rapid cooling is the goal using wet towels, spray mist, sponge baths and removal from the heat. This condition could cause the athlete to go into shock and coma may follow so immediate medical attention is required.

Reference:

American College of Sports Medicine POSITION STAND. Exercise and Fluid

Replacement, Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 2007

Acknowledgements:

Dr. Rudy Gittens

Past Medical Director, Canadian Soccer Association

Submitted by:

Dr. Robert Gringmuth

Chair, OSA Medical Advisory Committee

Concussion Protocol and Recognition Tools



Code of Conduct

This Code of Conduct identifies the standard of behavior, which is expected of all Paris Soccer Club members and participants, which for the purposes of this policy shall include all players, parents, coaches, officials, volunteers, directors, officers, committee members, conveners, team managers, trainers, spectators and administrators involved in Paris Soccer Club activities and events.

The Paris Soccer Club is committed to providing an environment in which all individuals are treated with respect. Members and participants of the Paris Soccer Club shall conduct themselves at all times in a manner consistent with the values of the Paris Soccer Club, which include fairness, integrity and mutual respect.

During the course of all Paris Soccer Club activities and events, members shall avoid behavior which brings the Paris Soccer Club or the sport of soccer into disrepute, including and not limited to abusive use of alcohol, the use of non-medical drugs and the use of alcohol by minors.

The Paris Soccer Club members and participants shall at all times adhere to the Twin Rivers Soccer League operational policies and procedures, to rules and regulations governing Paris Soccer Club events and activities, and to the rules and regulations governing any competitions in which the member participates on behalf of the Paris Soccer Club.

Members and participants of the Paris Soccer Club shall not engage in any activity or behavior which interferes with a completion or with any player or teams’ preparation for a completion, or which endangers the safety of others.

Members of the Paris Soccer Club shall refrain from comments or behavior, which is disrespectful, offensive, abusive, racist or sexist. In particular, behavior which constitutes harassment or abuse, will not be tolerated, and will be dealt with under the Paris Soccer Club Harassment and Abuse Policy.

Failure to comply with this Code of Conduct may result in disciplinary action in accordance with the disciplinary policy of the Twin Rivers Soccer League. Such action may result in a member losing the privileges which come with membership in the Paris Soccer Club, including the opportunity to participate in Paris Soccer Club activities and events, both present and future.

All Paris Soccer Club members and participants must consider it a privilege to be a part of The Paris Soccer Club and understand that their actions will reflect credit upon the organization and its affiliates. As such all Paris Soccer Club members and participants must conduct themselves in accordance to the Code of Conduct described below. Any breaches of the code of conduct must be brought to the attention of the Board of Directors and may result in loss of privilege as part of the Paris Soccer Club.

Parents/Guardians and Spectators

PARENTS BEHAVIOUR

It’s natural for parents to be concerned about how their child is being coached and the methods utilized. If you have serious concerns, bring the issue to the attention of the Convenor to arrange a meeting with the coach. By discussing your concerns calmly and rationally, you should be able to resolve the problem (refer to the PARENT/GUARDIAN GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE below).

Confrontations between coaches and parents that are driven by emotion usually end with a bad result. These confrontations have on occasion escalated from verbal to physical exchanges and there have been cases where coaches have been seriously injured.

  • As a parent/guardian/spectator of a child participating in a PSC program you must understand that first and foremost the child participates in this sport to have fun. All parents/guardians/spectators will adhere to this code of conduct in conjunction with the Family Code of Conduct Waiver and is responsible for reviewing both documents.
  • Do your individual best to bring a sense of civility and sportsmanship to my child’s games. In doing so; always be positive and encouraging towards all of the players—not just their own—and will encourage parents/ guardians/spectators to:
    • Applaud the opposition as well as their own team.
    • Avoid coaching the child during the game.
    • Not shout and scream.
    • Respect the referee’s decisions.
    • Give attention to each of the children involved in soccer not just the most talented.
    • Give encouragement to everyone to participate in soccer.
  • Always keep in mind that the coaches & the administrators of this program volunteer their time to help your child.
  • Always demonstrate to your child, his/her teammates through your words & actions that winning does not equate to success in youth sports.
  • Always conduct myself in accordance with the true spirit of “Good Sportsmanship.”
  • Will not argue with, publicly question, heckle, harass, antagonize, and disrespect Referees, Coaches/Assistants, players or PSC Conveners during practice, game, and league function or at any other time.
  • Always display sportsmanship towards all players, coaches, referees & other officials during any practice, game or other league function.
  • Will not use abusive or profane language at any practice, game or other league function.
  • Will not incite or participate in any unsportsmanlike conduct at any practice, game or other league function, including verbal abuse, physical assault or intimidation of any kind, including hitting, slapping, pushing, spitting, kicking or striking in any way with any part of the body.
  • Will accept all decisions & calls of the referee & game officials as being fair & made to the best of their ability.
  • Understand that failure to comply with any part of this Code of Conduct may result in any combination of verbal or written warnings, removal of parent/guardian/spectator from the game or practice, or removal of parent/guardian/spectator for the season.

PARENT/GUARDIAN GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE

If a parent or guardian has a concern and would like to speak to the coach, he or she must first contact the team’s convener.

After a twenty-four hour waiting period, the convener will arrange a meeting between the parent/guardian, coach and convener. If the issue is not resolved to the satisfaction of all parties, it may be referred to the Head Convener of the Paris Soccer Club so that they may help to resolve the matter in question.

POLICE RECORDS CHECK

Who should get a police record check?

Police record checks are an essential part of this Club’s ongoing management of volunteers. Police checks will be required every TWO years. Records checks will be required for the following individuals:

  • Paris Soccer Club Board Members
  • Paris Soccer Club Conveners
  • Coaches and Assistant Coaches
  • All other volunteers who: come in direct contact with players on a consistent basis, and those who are responsible for handling funds.
  • Current prohibitions or probation orders forbidding the individual to have contact with children under the age of 14
  • Outstanding convictions or charges pending for any violent offence, whether or not it involved weapons
  • Outstanding convictions or charges pending for criminal driving offences, including but not limited to impaired driving
  • Individuals with outstanding convictions (5 years old or more recent), for provincial offences related to bona fide occupational requirement or qualification, may be excluded from a position of trust, depending on the circumstances
  • Applicants may be rejected as a result of other information gained during the police records check process or through the screening process as a whole, or as a consequence of other factors. The applicant has the right to know why he or she is being refused, and may appeal to the Board of Directors in writing.

CRITERIA FOR ACCEPTANCE AS A VOLUNTEER WITH THE PARIS SOCCER CLUB

Those individuals whose police check show conviction or pending charges for Physical or Sexual assault, and indictable criminal offences for child abuse, during any point in their lifetime are not acceptable candidates for a volunteer position with the Paris Soccer Club. These applicants will not be permitted to participate in any way, or in any capacity with the Paris Soccer Club.

Those individuals with outstanding Criminal Code convictions (other than physical or sexual assault, and child abuse) 5 years old or more recent, or have charges pending for certain offences will not be accepted for a position with the Paris Soccer Club. These offences include, but are not limited to:

It should be noted that every volunteer, once accepted, is obligated to inform the appropriate association executive if he or she is charged, tried or convicted of any offence under the Criminal Code or under other Provincial or Federal Statutes. That is if the offence is relative to a position of trust held by the individual. If charges are pending while volunteering for the Paris Soccer Club, that individual will be suspended pending resolution, or that individual can resign and return when the situation has been resolved. (in accordance with the Paris Soccer Club Police Check Policy)

PLAYERS:

  • A player should always:
    • Make every effort to develop and improve their own sporting ability, skills, technique, tactics and stamina.
    • Give maximum effort and strive for the best possible performance during a game, even if the team is in a position where the desired result has already been achieved.
    • Set a positive example for others, particularly young players and supporters.
    • Avoid all forms of gamesmanship and time-wasting.
    • Not use inappropriate language or hurtful and damaging language towards other players or teams.
    • Never be involved in any circumstances that are offensive, harassing or suggest sexual connotations and adhere to the PSC Harassment and Abuse Policy.
  • Obligations towards the Team
    • Make every effort consistent with Fair Play and the Laws of the Game to help the team win.
    • Resist any influence that might, or might be seen to bring into question the commitment to the team winning.
  • Respect for the Laws of the Game and Competition Rules
    • Know and abide by the Laws, rules and spirit of the game, and the competition rules.
    • Accept success and failure, victory and defeat, equally.
    • Resist any temptation to take banned substances or use banned techniques.
  • Respect towards Opponents
    • Treat opponents with due respect at all times, irrespective of the result of the game.
    • Safeguard the physical fitness of opponents, avoid violence and rough play and help injured opponents.
  • Respect towards the Referees
    • Accept the decision of the Referee without protest.
    • Avoid words or actions that may mislead a Referee.
    • Show due respect towards Referee.
  • Respect towards Team Officials
    • Abide by the instructions of their Coach and Team Officials, provided they do not contradict the spirit of this Code.
    • Show due respect towards the Team Officials of the opposition.
  • Obligations towards the Supporters/Spectators
    • Show due respect to the interests of supporters and Spectators.

Coaches/Managers/Assistant Coaches/Conveners

  • Be committed to improve the performance of ALL the players and the team physically and mentally.
  • Provide a high quality soccer program for ALL players with a positive environment/atmosphere.
  • Be thoroughly acquainted with FIFA Laws of the Game and understand and practice sound principles of coaching.
  • Respect ALL participants, including players, referees, assistant coaches, opponent coaches and assistants, conveners, parents, opponent’s parents and other spectators. This respect must be maintained off and on the pitch and is not restricted to PSC functions only.
  • Understand that the Referee has the final say/call and you must agree to accept all decisions & calls of the referee & game officials as being fair & made to the best of their ability. This does not apply when the decision is involving the risk and danger to the player or any participant in PSC (ie. Not stopping play when there is lightening in the area).
  • Encourage players to win within the laws of the game.
  • Be enthusiastic and positive while ensuring that they are generous with praise when deserved (for all involved).
  • Maintain the high standards of personal conduct, professionalism and fair play.
  • Never be involved in any circumstances that are offensive, harassing or suggest sexual connotations and adhere to the PSC Harassment and Abuse Policy.

GAME OFFICIALS

Referees, linesmen and timekeepers are an integral part of the game of soccer. They have an important role to play to ensure that play is safe, fair and enjoyable. Play is still conducted “in the spirit of the game”.

The onus on officials is to be fair to both teams in the enforcement of the rules. Officials must treat the players, coaches, and other game officials such as conveners and spectators with respect, and in return, should be treated with respect before, during and after games. Officials must handle games and players in a manner that promotes fair play and good sportsmanship.

Officials should not tolerate harassment from spectators, parents, players or coaches. They have the full support of the Paris Soccer Club. Those who are responsible for subjecting officials to harassment may be removed from the area and subject to further disciplinary measures as determined by the Twin Rivers Disciplinary Committee.

Referees having certain privileges through and by PSC, with respect to the game, shall realize and respect their responsibilities and duties to the PSC and the game.

  • Specifically Referees shall:
    • Conduct themselves with dignity both on and off the field of play and shall, by example, endeavor to inspire the true principles of fair play and earn the respect of those whom they serve;
    • Not cause the PSC to become involved in any controversial matters and shall abide by the rules and regulations of the jurisdiction in which they officiate;
    • Adhere to all standards and directives;
    • Always be neat in appearance and maintain a high level of physical and mental fitness;
    • Study the Laws of the game and be aware of all changes, and shall enforce all said Laws and changes;
    • Perform their designated responsibilities, including attending organized clinics and lectures, etc., and shall assist their colleagues in upgrading and improving their standards of officiating, instructing and assessing;
    • Honour any appointments made for and accepted by them unless unable to do so by virtue of illness or personal emergency;
    • Not publicly criticize other referees or any soccer association nor shall they make any statements to the media related to any game in which they were involved;
    • Be subject to disciplinary action for not complying with this Code of Conduct.
    • Keep soccer Safe, Fair and Fun (in that order).

PARIS SOCCER CLUB HARASSMENT AND ABUSE POLICY

The Paris Soccer Club is a youth orientated soccer program dedicated to providing an organized environment to the residents of the Paris area.

The Paris Soccer Club must endeavour to provide a sports environment free from all forms of harassment and abuse. Our members will be treated with respect and dignity. Each individual has the right to participate in a program that promotes equal opportunities and prohibits discrimination.

By providing a harassment free environment, we will promote the growth of volunteerism and the development of our players. We are committed to the education of all our members so they can understand the harm, both physical and emotional, that can take place in an environment where harassment is allowed.

Each member of the Paris Soccer Club will be aware of their responsibilities in eliminating harassment and abuse from our association. There will be zero tolerance for all forms of harassment.

When it does occur, it will be dealt with swiftly and fairly, taking the utmost care to protect the privacy of everyone involved in the incident. Together, we can make this possible, our members deserve no less.

PLAYERS

The players are our most important members. From their earliest involvement to the time they leave us, their growth as soccer players and young adults depends on our commitment to provide them with a harassment free environment in which to develop these skills. Their wellbeing must be protected not only on the soccer pitch but whenever they are involved in Paris Soccer Club sanctioned activities. We are legally and morally bound to protect them from all forms of harassment. Sports are meant to be a time to develop not only soccer skills, but also life skills.

VOLUNTEERS

Volunteers by definition are the backbone of our association. We depend on their dedication and unique skills and talents to fill the different positions needed to provide a soccer program. Volunteers run the Paris Soccer Club. Their willingness to spend long hours away from their own families, providing opportunities for the sons and daughters of our members are at times under appreciated. All members of the Paris Soccer Club owe these people a vote of confidence, our respect and our thanks. For these reasons and many others, we must provide rules, guidelines and a risk free environment allowing them to continue providing leadership that makes the Paris Soccer Club successful.

PARENTS

Parents are also stakeholders in the Harassment and Abuse Policy. They must feel comfortable with our efforts to provide their sons and daughters with a safe and harassment free environment to play soccer. They must know we are doing everything possible to protect their children.

CHILD ABUSE DEFINED

Child abuse is any form of physical, emotional and/or sexual mistreatment or lack of care, which causes physical injury or emotional damage to a child. A common characteristic of all forms of abuse against children and youth is an abuse of power or authority and/or breach of trust.

EMOTIONAL ABUSE DEFINED

Emotional abuse is a chronic attack on a child’s self esteem; it is psychologically destructive behavior by a person in a position of power, authority or trust. It can take the form of name calling, threatening, ridiculing, berating, intimidating, isolating, hazing or ignoring the child’s needs.

PHYSICAL ABUSE DEFINED

Physical abuse is when a person in a position of power or trust purposefully injures or threatens to injure a child or youth. This may take the form of slapping, hitting, shaking, kicking, pulling the hair or ears, throwing, shoving, grabbing, hazing or excessive exercise as a form of punishment.

SEXUAL ABUSE DEFINED

Sexual abuse is when a young person is used by an older child, adolescent or adult for his or her own sexual stimulation or gratification. There are two categories:

1. CONTACT

· Touched or fondled in sexual areas

· Forced to touch another’s sexual areas

· Kissed or held in a sexual manner

· Vaginal or anal intercourse

· Forced to perform oral sex

· Vaginal or anal penetration with a finger or abject

· Sexual hazing

2. NON-CONTACT

· Obscene phone calls

· Flashing

· Shown pornography

· Forced to watch sex acts

· Intrusive questions or comments

· Indecent exposure

· Forced to pose for sexual videos or photographs

NEGLECT

This may occur in soccer when injuries are not adequately treated or players are made to play with injuries, equipment is inadequate or unsafe, no one intervenes when team members are persistently harassing another player, or road trips are not properly supervised.

HARASSMENT

Behaviour including comments, conduct or gestures which is insulting, intimidating, humiliating, hurtful, malicious, degrading, or otherwise offensive to an individual or group of individuals or behavior which creates an uncomfortable environment, or which might reasonably be expected to cause embarrassment, insecurity, discomfort, offence or humiliation to another person or group, including but not limited to:

· Written or verbal abuse or threats

· Physical assault

· Unwelcome remarks, jokes, innuendoes, or taunting about a person’s body, sexual orientation, attire, age, marital status, ethnic or racial origin, religion, etc.

· Displaying of sexually explicit, racist or other offensive or derogatory material, sexual, racial, ethnic or religious graffiti

· Practical jokes which cause awkwardness or embarrassment, endangering a person’s safety or negatively affecting performance

· Hazing or initiation rites

· Leering or other suggestive or obscene gestures

· Intimidation

· Condescension, paternalism, or patronizing behavior which undermines self respect or adversely affects performance

· Comments, conduct gestures or contact of a sexual nature that is likely to cause offence or humiliation or that might be perceived as placing a condition of a sexual nature on selection or advancement

· False accusation or harassment motivated by malice or mischief and meant to cause harm, are considered to be harassment

· Acts of retaliation towards an individual making a harassment complaint

DISCIPLINE IN SPORT

Discipline is an indispensible part of soccer and should not be confused with discrimination or harassment. However, it is of vital importance that those in authority:

· Set and communicate performance and training standards to all participants

· Ensure that training involving touching or other physical contact occurs in an appropriate setting and only after informed consent has been sought and received

· Be consistent and non-harassing in taking an corrective or punitive action

· Use non-harassing terminology: address individuals by name and avoid the use of derogatory, slang or offensive terms.

DUTY TO REPORT

It is the policy of the Paris Soccer Club that any Paris Soccer Club personnel (volunteer, participant, team official, referee) or Paris Soccer Club partner (parent or guardian) who has reasonable grounds to suspect that a participant is or may be suffering, or may have suffered from emotional, physical abuse and neglect and/or sexual abuse shall immediately report the suspicion and the information on which it is based to the local child protection agency and/or the local Police Service. In Ontario, a person is considered a child up to the age of 16 years.

Those involved with the Paris Soccer Club in providing soccer opportunities for participants understand and agree that abuse or neglect, as defined above, may be the subject of a criminal investigation and/or disciplinary procedures. Failure to report an offence and thereby, to provide safety for participants may render the adult who keeps silent legally liable for conviction under provincial legislation.

Through education, the Paris Soccer Club is weaving a tighter safety web around our most precious resource….THE PLAYERS!

Confidentiality:

It can be extremely difficult to come forward with a complaint of harassment and that it can be devastating to be wrongly convicted of harassment. We have to recognize the interests of both the Complainant and the Respondent in keeping the matter confidential, except where such disclosure is required by law, upon the conclusion of the matter or is in the best interest of the public.

Harassment Complaint Procedure

Any individual may report any complaint of harassment to the PSC. Such a complaint must be in writing and signed, and must be filed within sixty (60) days of the alleged incident. Anonymous complaints may be accepted at the PSC sole discretion.

The PSC may act as the complainant and initiate the complaint process under the terms of this Policy. In such cases, the PSC will identify an individual to represent the PSC.

Prior to filing a complaint, a person who experiences harassment is encouraged to make it known to the harasser that the behavior is unwelcome, offensive and contrary to this policy. If confronting the harasser is not possible, or if after confronting the harasser the harassment continues, the Complainant can request a meeting with the PSC.

Once a complaint is received there are three outcomes:

a) It may be determined that the conduct does not constitute harassment as defined in this policy, in which case the matter will be closed or referred to another governing organization; or

b) The Complainant may decide to pursue an informal resolution of the complaint, in which case PSC will assist the complainant and respondent to negotiate an acceptable resolution of the complaint.

c) It may be determined that the harassment complaint put forth warrants a hearing to further investigate the issue.

The PSC may determine that the alleged conduct is of such seriousness as to warrant suspension of the individual pending the hearing and decision, or the completion of a criminal process.

Harassment complaints occurring within competitions may be dealt with immediately, if necessary, by a PSC representative is in a position of authority, provided the individual being disciplined is told the nature of the infraction, and has an opportunity to provide information concerning the incident. In such situations, sanctions will be for the duration of the competition only. Further sanctions may be applied but only after review of the matter in accordance with the procedures set out in this policy

Harassment Hearing

If the harassment complaint warrants a hearing the PSC will establish a panel consisting of 1-3 Adjudicators to hear the complaint.

The hearing may involve an oral hearing in person, an oral hearing by telephone, a hearing based on written submissions or a combination of these methods. The hearing will be governed by the PSC and the Panel deem appropriate in the circumstances, provided that:

a) The hearing will be held within the appropriate timeline.

b) The Parties will be given appropriate notice of the day, time and place of the hearing.

c) Copies of any written documents which the parties wish to have the Panel consider will be provided to all Parties in advance of the hearing.

d) Both Parties may be accompanied by a representative or adviser, including legal counsel at their own expense.

e) The Panel may request that any other individual participate and give evidence at the hearing.

f) The decision will be by a majority vote of Panel members

Decision

After hearing the matter, the Panel will determine whether harassment has occurred and if so what appropriate sanction will be imposed. The Panel's written decision, with reasons, will be distributed to all parties and the PSC within fourteen (14) days of the conclusion of the hearing. The decision will be considered a matter of public record unless decided otherwise by the Panel.

Where the Respondent acknowledges the facts of the incident, he or she may waive the hearing, in which case the Panel will determine the appropriate sanction. The Panel may hold a hearing for the purpose of determining an appropriate sanction.

If the Respondent chooses not to participate in the hearing, the hearing will proceed in any event.

In fulfilling its duties, the Panel may obtain independent advice.

Sanctions

The Panel may apply the following disciplinary sanctions singly or in combination, for major infractions:

a) Verbal or written warning;

b) Verbal or written apology;

c) Service or other voluntary contribution;

d) Removal of certain privileges;

e) Suspension from certain teams, events and/or activities;

f) Suspension from all activities for a designated period of time;

g) Expulsion;

h) Other sanctions as may be considered appropriate for the offense.

Unless the Panel decides otherwise, any disciplinary sanctions will commence immediately. Failure to comply with a sanction as determined by the Panel will result in automatic suspension until such time as compliance occurs.

A written record will be maintained by the PSC.

Appeals ??

The decision of the Panel may be appealed???

CODE OF CONDUCT

This Code of Conduct identifies the standard of behavior, which is expected of all Paris Soccer Club members and participants, which for the purposes of this policy shall include all players, parents, coaches, officials, volunteers, directors, officers, committee members, conveners, team managers, trainers, and administrators involved in Paris Soccer Club activities and events.

The Paris Soccer Club is committed to providing an environment in which all individuals are treated with respect. Members and participants of the Paris Soccer Club shall conduct themselves at all times in a manner consistent with the values of the Paris Soccer Club, which include fairness, integrity and mutual respect.

During the course of all Paris Soccer Club activities and events, members shall avoid behavior which brings the Paris Soccer Club or the sport of soccer into disrepute, including and not limited to abusive use of alcohol, the use of non-medical drugs and the use of alcohol by minors.

The Paris Soccer Club members and participants shall at all times adhere to the Twin Rivers Soccer League operational policies and procedures, to rules and regulations governing Paris Soccer Club events and activities, and to the rules and regulations governing any competitions in which the member participates on behalf of the Paris Soccer Club.

Members and participants of the Paris Soccer Club shall not engage in any activity or behavior which interferes with a completion or with any player or teams’ preparation for a completion, or which endangers the safety of others.

Members of the Paris Soccer Club shall refrain from comments or behavior, which is disrespectful, offensive, abusive, racist or sexist. In particular, behavior which constitutes harassment or abuse, will not be tolerated, and will be dealt with under the Paris Soccer Club Harassment and Abuse Policy.

Failure to comply with this Code of Conduct may result in disciplinary action in accordance with the disciplinary policy of the Twin Rivers Soccer League. Such action may result in a member losing the privileges which come with membership in the Paris Soccer Club, including the opportunity to participate in Paris Soccer Club activities and events, both present and future.

GAME OFFICIALS

Referees, linesmen and timekeepers are an integral part of the game of soccer. They have an important role to play to ensure that play is safe, fair and enjoyable. Play is still conducted “in the spirit of the game”.

The onus on officials is to be fair to both teams in the enforcement of the rules. Officials must treat the players, coaches, and other game officials such as conveners and spectators with respect, and in return, should be treated with respect before, during and after games. Officials must handle games and players in a manner that promotes fair play and good sportsmanship.

Officials should not tolerate harassment from spectators, parents, players or coaches. They should have the full support of the Paris Soccer Club. Those who are responsible for subjecting officials to harassment may be removed from the area and subject to further disciplinary measures as determined by the Twin Rivers Disciplinary Committee.

POLICE RECORDS CHECK

Who should get a police record check?

Police record checks are an essential part of this Club’s ongoing management of volunteers. Police checks will be required every three years with the 2012 soccer year as the base year. Records checks will be required for the following individuals:

· Paris Soccer Club Board Members

· Paris Soccer Club Conveners

· Coaches and Assistant Coaches

· All other volunteers who: come in direct contact with players on a consistent basis, and those who are responsible for handling funds

CRITERIA FOR ACCEPTANCE AS A VOLUNTEER WITH THE PARIS SOCCER CLUB

Those individuals whose police check show conviction or pending charges for Physical or Sexual assault, and indictable criminal offences for child abuse, during any point in their lifetime are not acceptable candidates for a volunteer position with the Paris Soccer Club. These applicants will not be permitted to participate in any way, or in any capacity with the Paris Soccer Club.

Those individuals with outstanding Criminal Code convictions (other than physical or sexual assault, and child abuse) 5 years old or more recent, or have charges pending for certain offences will not be accepted for a position with the Paris Soccer Club. These offences include, but are not limited to:

· Current prohibitions or probation orders forbidding the individual to have contact with children under the age of 14

· Outstanding convictions or charges pending for any violent offence, whether or not it involved weapons

· Outstanding convictions or charges pending for criminal driving offences, including but not limited to impaired driving

· Individuals with outstanding convictions (5 years old or more recent), for provincial offences related to bona fide occupational requirement or qualification, may be excluded from a position of trust, depending on the circumstances

· Applicants may be rejected as a result of other information gained during the police records check process or through the screening process as a whole, or as a consequence of other factors. The applicant has the right to know why he or she is being refused, and may appeal to the Board of Directors in writing.

It should be noted that every volunteer, once accepted, is obligated to inform the appropriate association executive if he or she is charged, tried or convicted of any offence under the Criminal Code or under other Provincial or Federal Statutes. That is if the offence is relative to a position of trust held by the individual. If charges are pending while volunteering for the Paris Soccer Club, that individual will be suspended pending resolution, or that individual can resign and return when the situation has been resolved. (in accordance with the Paris Soccer Club Police Check Policy)

PARENTS BEHAVIOUR

It’s natural for parents to be concerned about how their child is being coached and the methods utilized. If you have serious concerns, bring the issue to the attention of the Team Manager or Parent Liaison to arrange a meeting with the coach. By discussing your concerns calmly and rationally, you should be able to resolve the problem. If you are unable to reach an understanding, contact the Convener of the division and the Head Convener of the Paris Soccer Club.

Confrontations between coaches and parents that are driven by emotion usually end with a bad result. These confrontations have on occasion escalated from verbal to physical exchanges and there have been cases where coaches have been seriously injured.

PARENT/GUARDIAN GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE

If a parent or guardian has a concern and would like to speak to the coach, he or she must first contact the team’s parent liaison.

After a twenty-four hour waiting period, the parent liaison will arrange a meeting between the parent/guardian, coach and parent liaison. If the issue is not resolved to the satisfaction of all parties, it may be referred to the Convener of the Division and Head Convener of the Paris Soccer Club so that they may help to resolve the matter in question.